To Persist and Affirm

Has anyone ever heard of a game show called “What’s My Line?”? Popularized in the 1960s and 1970, this classic game show asked its panelists to guess what each contestant did for a living. From this game show, we can suppose that it’s something of a challenge to try and guess someone’s line of work based on just a few random and seemingly insignificant clues. In order to succeed at the game, it takes one that is willing to persist. The other person must affirm the idea of the one that persists. What is persistence? I’m aware that some readers may seek to proclaim that “The Little Engine That Could” is a great example of persistence. After all, doesn’t the little engine repeatedly say: “I think I can.” It’s not an accident that this phrase has the rhyme and meter of a real locomotive. One thinks about persist for a moment. We can say that persist is a word that relates to “perspire”. To perspire means to sweat profusely through the exertion of much effort. Persist comes from the latin word persistere. Persistere means to abide. When we abide, we make the choice to complete a goal while staying determined to finish the goal no matter what happens.  On my first day back to college, I was met with many challenges, even though I had done everything in my power months before to mitigate these obstacles. I schedule classes in November. I completed appointments with counselors. I even met with faculty to give advice about the best plan for my future coursework. When I went to school today, all of courses were purged. I was very surprised and unhappy. I felt that I had done more than what most students do to prepare for school.

I had to persist with the goal. The goal was to attend class and finish registration. When we are working on something very great, we must prepare for adversity. It’s only my second semester in college, and I have already experienced many situations that were uniquely different from my previous stint in college. When we abide with something, we must be ready to face many episodes of rejection before we reach victory. Sometimes, the rejection comes in a form of emotional sabotage. Emotional sabotage is the act of projecting one’s emotional trauma onto an otherwise purpose-driven individual.

When emotional sabotage is found at the center of a relationship. It creates perpetual strife between each person. The person who faces the most shame and pain, is often the person who engage in emotional sabotage. The idea of emotional sabotage is to make the individual who receives the sabotage just as ashamed and hurt as the primary victim is.

The best weapon toward emotional sabotage is often positive affirmation. Positive affirmation is when one takes the negative emotions of another person and acknowledges them, while also choose to acknowledge the positive facts about the exchange.

A negative situation always has a few positive points to consider. For example, when I wrecked my first car, I immediately thought… I guess I’m done driving.

Positive Affirmation in action. 1) I survived the auto accident with no injury.

2) The car is replaceable. There is only one me.

3) I still have my license and I can change my driving         routine to complement what I learned from my accident.

Negative people can take your tragedy and say that once you have one auto accident… you should stop driving. If you let the opinion of others stop your will to progress. You will not progress.

To persist in a dark situation, you must affirm the positive outreach that you’ve done in and around your environment. Sometimes, it takes a list of things to see just how great you are.

Persist and Affirm. Never Give UP!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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